Cautiously Optimistic Happy Dance

 

Time for another happy dance, folks…

Yes, I love Steve Carrell

I need to celebrate the little milestones, although this one isn’t so little.

I received a FULL manuscript request from an editor. And of course, the minute I saw it, I started my own little happy dance around my kitchen island. Then called my hubby, parents, posted on Facebook, and texted a few folks.

I know I got a little ahead of myself. This isn’t a request for representation yet or a publishing contract (if only!). But I’ve only had 1 other full manuscript request in my life, so I have to grin about this!

I entered an online pitch contest, where I had 35 words to entice editors to want more. That’s it. 35 words.  ACK!!

Do you know how hard it is to create an entire book blurb in just 35 words? And not just that, but to make the editor/agent drooling for more. I thought writing a 1 page query was tough.

I submitted the pitch, along with 199 other people, thinking that at best I would get a request for the first chapter or ten pages. But a FULL? Sweetness!!!

Granted, there were at least 20 people who received full manuscript requests, but I’d expect that. Because I read through a lot of the other pitches and they were excellent! Really intriguing stories that had me drooling. Clearly, writing a 35-word blurb was easier for them than for me.

And congrats to all the other folks who received requests, as well. This industry is freakin’ tough and anything like this that gives us opportunities, I’ll rave over.

I’ll let you know if anything comes of this. For now, I’ll do my little happy dance and keep on writing.

 

On Track for NaNoWriMo

Hooray!

Hooray!

I’m stunned to say it. Yes, I admit, I didn’t think I would be anywhere near this far along in my writing goal for National Novel Writing Month just four days in.

Not that I was rooting for myself to do poorly, but I’m impressed with what I’ve done. I’ve had three GREAT writing days (great for my record anyway, with a 3 year old constantly needing attention). I hope my son doesn’t suffer any trauma by having a slightly less than attentive mother for the next few short weeks.

Granted, I knew I had to over-deliver on certain days because I know there will be times during the month I won’t be able to write at all. (Thanksgiving, for example. What writer can deny that incredible feast and time for reflection. And perhaps a weekend here-and-there for precious time with my hubby). But 16% to goal in just four days, that makes me happy.

And so ensues the Steve Carrell happy dance!

Now back to breakfast. Maybe some writing later. I hope so.

Bring on the Novel Writing Marathon

The novel writing marathon has begun! My first ever participation in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), and I’m off to a decent start. So far, I’ve written 2500 words today, on track to reach the goal of 50,000 words by the end of the month. However I know there will be several days during the month I will not be able to write anything, so I’ll have to make up those words along the way.

All in all, I think I’ll be really happy with myself if I reach 35,000 words by the end of the month. So 50,000 would just be gravy.

So if you don’t hear much from me over the course of the month, that’s why. But I’ll update my word counter on my main page as I go along, so you can keep track with me. And keep me motivated! I’ll need all the help I can get!

Now to bury myself in more words.

I Win the Fights in my WIP

I don’t get to win too many arguments in my life. Mainly because I get too tongue-tied or flabbergasted to respond, until several hours or even days after the argument, I think of the perfect comeback or stinger, and by then of course it’s too late. I’ve already lost. Easy to say I’m not a confrontational person.

Except for writing. I just finished a scene in my WIP where my heroine and hero have a fight (not with fists, although she has the urge to slap him), but with words. I still suffer from the same deficiency and have trouble creating comebacks on the spot, but that’s what’s great about writing. I can think of the perfect quip and insert it in the middle of the argument later. Doesn’t matter how much time has passed. It still flows, and either way I WIN THE ARGUMENT! 😉

It’s interesting to note that the fight scene between my main characters flowed from my mind more easily than other scenes. I wonder if it’s the same with other authors. The most tense scenes in novels are often the easiest to write (or the scenes authors already have visualized before the rest of the book is plotted. It is said that JK Rowling had the last scene between Harry Potter and Voldermort completed before she even started the series). I write out the harsh words as I feel them come to me, and if I think of something later that’s better, more damaging to their self-confidence, or more of a knife-in-the-gut, I can amend it.

Writing has helped me explore my confrontational side, which I believed was non-existent before I started. I’m not saying I’m more confrontational in real-life now that I’ve started writing, but it’s helped me delve into a side I didn’t know I had. And I’m glad I’m able to put that side of me into a character that’s on paper, that way none of the evidence leads back to me and the only people who are hurt are entirely fictional. 😉

I must say, its nice to win an argument every now and then.